Category Archives: Congregations in Transition

Congregations in Transition Update

by the Rev. Canon Michael Ambler, Canon to the Ordinary

Since starting this new position on diocesan staff in early September, the learning curve has been nearly vertical but the work is immensely satisfying. So, before I offer this update on congregations in transition, I would like to say that I love this work, and I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to serve the Diocese of Maine, its Bishop, clergy and congregations in this new role.

  • St. Mark’s Augusta, has called the Rev. Erik Karas, the Lutheran pastor who also serves Prince of Peace Lutheran Church, as their Priest in Charge.
  • Grace, Bath, is developing its profile. The Rev. George Lambert is serving as Interim Priest in Charge. (Since Grace Church is my former parish, Bishop Lane is serving as transition consultant there.)
  • St. Margaret’s, Belfast, is receiving names. The Rev. Mary Ann Taylor is serving as Interim Priest in Charge.
  • St. Patrick’s, Brewer, has called the Rev. Rick Cross as Priest in Charge.
  • St. John the Baptist, Brownsville Junction, and St. Augustine, Dover Foxcroft, are receiving names.
  • St. Anne’s, Calais, is beginning the discernment process.
  • Christ Church, Gardiner, has called the Rev. Amelia Hagan as Interim Priest in Charge.
  • Church of our Father, Hull’s Cove, has called the Rev. Suzanne Cole as Priest in Charge.
  • St. David’s, Kennebunk, is beginning its discernment process as the Rev. Dan Riggall retires at the end of December.
  • St. Peter’s, Rockland, has called the Rev. Lael Sorensen as Priest in Charge.
  • St. Andrew’s, Winthrop, will be open as of December 13 when the Rev. Jim Gill, Priest in Charge, steps down.
  • St. Philip’s Wiscasset has called the Rev. Paul Tunkle as Priest in Charge.

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Godspeed, Canon Vicki Wiederkehr

Canon Vicki Wiederkehr (left) on Saturday joined by her sisters Pam and Deb.

Canon Vicki Wiederkehr (left) on Saturday joined by her sisters Pam and Deb.

Seventy-five people from across the Diocese of Maine gathered on Saturday morning at St. Mark’s in Waterville to give thanks for the ministry of Vicki Wiederkehr, Canon for Transition and Ministry Development, as she retires after 16 years on diocesan staff. In his remarks, Bishop Steve Lane said, “I think if you asked Vicki, she would say that she has done nothing remarkable – she has simply acted out of her love and care for God’s people – which is, in fact, the remarkable thing.”

Surrounded by her husband, Dan; two of her five sisters, Pam of  New York and Deb of Yarmouth; two of her children, Sarah of Freeport and Emily of Portland; and two of her four grandchildren, Maya and Grover, Vicki listened as 18 people stood to share their thanks and appreciation for her ministry. Several gave thanks on behalf of their congregations for her support to their transition processes, some clergy members shared appreciation for her pastoral care and friendship in times of sorrow, staff colleagues paid tribute to her example of professionalism and dedication.

As clergy and lay alternates at the 2006 General Convention in Columbus, Ohio,  the Rev. Calvin Sanborn and Vicki confer or goof off. It's hard to tell.

As clergy and lay alternates at the 2006 General Convention in Columbus, Ohio, the Rev. Calvin Sanborn and Vicki confer or goof off. It’s hard to tell.

With her retirement on June 27, Vicki will mark more than 25 years in the employ of the Episcopal Church. She started her career as a parish administrator in New York (working with the Rev. David Heald, now priest of St. Nicholas’, Scarborough.) When she and her family moved to Brunswick, she became the executive assistant to the Rt. Rev. Harold “Hoppy” Hopkins in the Office of Pastoral Development, a national church office based, during his tenure, in Yarmouth. She held that post for seven years. Bishop Hopkins’ retirement and the move of the office back to the Episcopal Church Center coincided with the election of Bishop Chilton Knudsen and, in 1998, she came to work for the Diocese of Maine. In 2002 she was named Canon for Ministry and Program. With the retirement of Canon Linton Studdiford in 2008, she added transition ministry to her portfolio.

Godspeed and God bless, Vicki!

Heidi Shott and Vicki (aka Pedro and Manny) in the Sunday River Chondala at the 2011 Convention. Photo by Michael Gleason.

Heidi Shott and Vicki (aka Pedro and Manny) in the Sunday River Chondala at the 2011 Convention. Photo by Michael Gleason.

Below are Bishop Steve’s remarks from Saturday’s service:

All of us who are baptized have a vocation to serve God in God’s world. Baptism both initiates our call to serve and empowers us for service. Moreover, it’s our confession that in baptism we receive all that we need to exercise our vocation, all the gifts we need to do the work God has invited us to do. Whoever we are… whatever our circumstances… we have all we need to share in God’s project of reconciliation.

That’s not how the world thinks about these matters, of course. These days, even the most basic occupation requires extensive education. We think in terms of degrees and certificates, in terms of the specific, sometimes highly arcane and technical, skills that are required for various kinds of work. A lot of us will be carrying the debt of our educations for decades.

Moreover today’s workplace is highly competitive. One can hardly rest on one’s laurels. Continuing education is a constant requirement. We have similar expectations in the church: we expect our clergy to be highly educated and expert at addressing issues as diverse as budgeting, fundraising, public speaking, volunteer management and suicide prevention. As a result of this kind of thinking, I believe it’s often the case that we exercise our ministries in the service of God with a certain hesitancy, a certain timidity. We aren’t sure we have what it takes, aren’t sure we can take the necessary risks.

But listen to what Jesus has to say… You are the salt of the earth – the flavoring for all God’s creation. You are the light of the world called to shed divine light into the darkest corners of the world. You are God’s chosen, God’s ministers. Be bold. Be brave. Stand on a lamp stand for all to see. And shine, shine, shine!

The power for our ministries is rooted not in education – although education is helpful – but in the confidence that we are loved by God, sent by God to share that love, and accompanied by God in all our doubts and uncertainties. God provides what we need for our part in God’s mission.

It’s very encouraging to all who of us who call ourselves Christian to see someone act in such confidence and share the love of God with his or her neighbors. That, quite simply, is what Vicki Wiederkehr has done among us.

We know Vicki as a loving presence, who loves the beauty of the natural world, flowers and trees; who loves children, her own and others; and who loves us. We who have had the pleasure of working with Vicki have felt the respect and love which Vicki has offered us. She brings to her work great care for people’s commitments and sensitivity to their emotional life. She cares for not only for the decisions that we need to make, but for how we feel about those decisions. She is voice reminding us that people need time to think, to process, to change.

Vicki has also reminded us of the sacramental nature of all ministry. It’s about relationships, about care for people, about the presence of God in people and things. Her ministry of caring for the sacred vessels and for the memorial gifts of churches that have closed has been inspiring

I think if you asked Vicki, she would say that she has done nothing remarkable – she has simply acted out of her love and care for God’s people – which is, in fact, the remarkable thing. In the midst of all the pressures to get her work done, to find clergy for the congregations, to follow the Title IV processes, to increase compliance with the requirements for safe church training, and all the rest, she has remembered that we are God’s people, and she has treated us that way.

Vicki has been clear with me that she doesn’t want long flowery speeches or flowing tributes, so I won’t carry on. Yet I believe she has put her light on a lampstand so that it gives light to the whole room. And all of us have responded to the light.

In a moment there will be a brief opportunity for you to share recollections about Vicki’s ministry. For now let me simply say, “Thank you.” Thank you, Vicki for the love and respect that has characterized your ministry. Thank you for your devotion, for your patience, for your steadfastness – for your commitment to God and us. You have flavored our life in the Diocese of Maine in a way that we will savor for years to come.

Amen.

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St. Stephen’s, Waterboro, on the Emmaus Road

Even when our hopes are dashed, Jesus comes along to feed us on the way.

Sermon by the Rt. Rev. Stephen T. Lane at the last worship service and deconsecration of St. Stephen the Martyr in Waterboro, Maine
May 3, 2014

Luke 24:13-35 

We turn today to one of the most beloved stories in all of scripture: the encounter between Jesus and two of his followers on the road to Emmaus on the evening of the resurrection. It’s a story of awakening and hope, a story that has set the pattern for Christian worship through the ages, a story of the empowerment of Jesus’ disciples for mission. And it is all those things. But before it is any of them, it is a story of broken hearts

ststephen

St. Stephen the Martyr, Waterboro

The two on the road are disciples, not the twelve, but certainly part of the inner circle. One is a man named Cleopas, which may be a form of the name Clopas, a shortened form of Cleopatros, meaning “glory of the father.” The other is not named, suggesting to some scholars that the other is a woman, and that this is a married couple fleeing from the dangers of Jerusalem and the upper room. They are leaving it all behind. They are hurrying along the road, discussing in whispers all that is happened. Their dismay and their anxiety are palpable.

They meet a man on the road, a stranger, who seems to know nothing of what has happened, neither of the crucifixion nor the claims of resurrection. And when he asks about those events, the story just pours out of them: “The things about Jesus of Nazareth, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word before God and all the people, and how our chief priests and leaders handed him over to be condemned to death and crucified him. But we had hoped that he was the one to redeem Israel…

It is these last words, “But we had hoped…” that have always grabbed me. “But we had hoped…” We had hoped he was the messiah. We had hoped he would overthrow the Roman oppressor. We had hoped that he would restore Israel to glory. We had hoped that Israel would no longer be the doormat at the crossroads of the ancient world.

But we had hoped… We had hoped our neighbor would recover. We had hoped that she would get that job. We had hoped that the cancer was beaten. We had hoped that he would come back to us. We had hoped that we could keep the house. We had hoped…

The words bespeak crushing disappointment, failure and grief. The loss of a dream, the death of a vision. And more that, these words speak of the loss of a future, a future dreamed about and prayed over for many years. What they had hoped for will not happen. What they had prayed for is lost.

Before it’s a story of resurrection, the story of the Emmaus road is a story of crucifixion. And it’s not a setup for Jesus’ triumph, not a cheap shot reminding us that resurrection requires a crucifixion. No! Whatever else Jesus is, he’s not what they expected. He’s not what they’d hoped for.

We need to sit with that for a bit. Can we be a church that honors disappointment? Can we be church that welcomes those who are crushed, whose dreams are broken? Can we be a church that embraces the reality of death in our lives – the jobs that aren’t found, the addictions that aren’t overcome, the broken relationships that aren’t healed, the hopes that aren’t realized? Can we hold to the faith that it is in the midst of real loss, genuine suffering, that Jesus comes near?

That’s our reality here today at St. Stephen’s. This service we offer today is one that no one wanted. It is not what we hoped for. It is the not the future we dreamed of. But it is the truth we have to face.

We would have liked it very much that Jesus had saved us from this, that Jesus’ resurrection meant that this church would not die, that we ourselves might never have to face suffering and death. A different outcome would have fit with our hopes, our dreams…

Yet today we say good-bye. We say good-bye, and we give thanks for the uncounted ways that St. Stephen’s has ministered both to its members and to the larger community. We give thanks for baptisms and marriages and burials. We give thanks for uncounted moments of insight, for strength and grace given and received, for myriad kindnesses offered, for unnumbered ministries of people now long forgotten. Our faith is that, though St. Stephen’s is passing from the scene, none of what has been done here is lost to God, that in the mystery of God’s economy, all that has been offered has been received and, more than that, has been used and is being used for the sake of God’s world.

The disciples recognized Jesus in the BREAKING of the bread. Bread, you know, doesn’t break cleanly. It shatters, it tears, it pulls apart. The breaking of bread is the very epitome of woundedness. But bread must be broken to be eaten, to be shared. You can’t eat an intact loaf. And it was in the moment of breaking the bread that the disciples saw him, saw Jesus, and knew there was more to come.

It was not what they’d hoped for, but there was life yet to come. There is a future, and God is in it. There is life, and Jesus is offering it. There is hope, and it will not be disappointed. But the breaking is real.

The story of the disciples on the Emmaus road reminds us that the Christian life is not about quick fixes and happy endings. It’s rather about a life of companionship with God, a journey we make together. On that journey we encounter real suffering and loss. Things do not turn out as we expect. But in the midst of all that God is present, and we meet him in our journey.

The Good News, the very Good News, for Cleopas and his companion, for you and for me, is that when the breaking is real, when our hopes are dashed and our dreams are lost, Jesus comes alongside and feeds us. God is encountered along the way, in the midst of very real grief and loss, and in the places and among people where we least expect to find God. Our task is to remain open, even in the midst of disappointment, and to learn from Jesus what new life God has in mind for us.
Amen.

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Congregations in Transition: (Almost) Spring 2014

Canon for Transition and Leadership Development Vicki Wiederkehr offers this brief listing of the status of all congregations in transition.

St. Mark’s, Augusta
Canon Vicki Wiederkehr, Lay Pastoral Administrator

St. Margaret’s, Belfast
The Rev. Martha Kirkpatrick’s Service of Leavetaking June 1. She leaves to become rector of St. Barnabas’, Wilmington, Delaware.

St. Patrick’s, Brewer
The Rev. Ann Kidder’s Service of Leavetaking March 27.

St. John’s, Brownville Junction
The Rev. Nancy Moore’s Service of Leavetaking April 27.

St. Anne’s, Calais
The Rev. Jenny Reece’s Service of Leavetaking April 27.

Trinity, Castine 
The Rev. Peg Thomas’ Service of Leavetaking April 27.

St. Augustine’s, Dover-Foxcroft
The Rev. Nancy Moore’s Service of Leavetaking April 27.

Christ Church, Gardiner
The Rev. George Lambert, Priest in Charge

Church of Our Father, Hulls Cove
Supply transition clergy.  Receiving names through March 30.

St. Aidan’s, Machias
Supply clergy.  Priest in Charge Letter of Agreement pending.

St. Mary and St. Jude, Northeast Harbor
The Rev. Jane Cornman called as Rector.

Christ Church, Norway   
The Rev. Elizabeth Miller, Transition Priest in Charge.
Vestry has called the Rev. Nancy Moore as Priest in Charge in collaboration with Trinity Lutheran Church, South Paris. Letters of Agreement in process.

St. James’, Old Town
The Rev. Dick Johnson, Priest in Charge

St. Peter’s, Rockland 
The Rev. John Van Siclen, Transition Priest in Charge.  Vestry developing congregational profile.

St. Barnabas, Rumford
Supply clergy.  Letter of Agreement for Priest in Charge pending.

St. Thomas, Winn
The Rev. Lev Sherman’s Service of Leavetaking April 13.

St. Andrew’s, Winthrop 
The Rev. Jim Gill, Pastoral Vicar

St. Philip’s, Wiscasset
Supply Clergy

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St. Matthias’ Church in Richmond secularized today

IMG_0930Roberts Hall served as St. Matthias' parish hall and meeting space.Signing papersBishop Steve Lane leads the Service of Secularization of St. Matthias', Richmond, Maine, on August 14, 2013.The Rev. Michael Ambler, rector of Grace Church, Bath, and president of the Standing Committee, reads the Declaration of Secularization.the order of service
This nativity scene, painted in 1951, will remain with the building.

St. Matthias’, Richmond, a set on Flickr.

Update: Bishop Steve Lane’s reflection on yesterday’s service

More than a year after the people of St. Matthias’, Richmond, voted to conclude holding worship services and ten months after the Diocese of Maine Convention approved the closing of this mission, Bishop Lane, other diocesan leaders, and officials from the Town of Richmond gathered to secularize the building on August 14.

St. Matthias’, home to an increasingly small number of members in recent years, wished the building to continue as a gift in the service of the community it had served since 1895. In the coming months it will become home to the community food pantry. Over the past year many, many liturgical items, pieces of furniture, and other objects of church life have found homes in Episcopal churches across Maine.

Bishop Steve Lane announced to those gathered: “We who are gathered here know that this building, which as been consecrated and set apart for the ministry of God’s holy Word and Sacraments, will no longer be used in this way, but will be used for other purposes. For many, this building has been hallowed by cherished memories, and we know that some will suffer a sense of loss. We pray that they will be comforted by the knowledge that the presence of God is not tied to any place or building. The Altar has been removed and protected from desecration. It is the intention of the diocese that the congregation which worshiped here will not be deprived of the ministry of the Word and Sacrament.”

The Lord bless us and keep us.
Amen

The Lord make his face to shine upon us, and be gracious to us.
Amen

The Lord lift up his countenance upon us, and give us peace.
Amen

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Transition ministry update from Canon Vicki Wiederkehr

Here’s an update on Maine congregations in transition from Vicki Wiederkehr, Canon for Formation and Transition Ministry:

Aroostook Cluster (St. Luke’s, Caribou; St. Paul’s, Fort Fairfield; Advent, Limestone; St. Anne’s, Mars Hill; St. John’s, Presque Isle): The Rev. Kevin Kinsey will be ordained priest and the Aroostook Cluster congregations will celebrate their new ministry with Kevin on Saturday, January 26, at 11 a.m. at St. Paul’s, Fort Fairfield.

St. Michael’s, Auburn: The Rev. Jim Low, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Mark’s, Augusta:  Supply clergy during transition

Christ Church, Biddeford:  At rest until the annual Diocesan Convention in October 2013. It will focus and transform its Jubilee ministry, Seeds of Hope Neighborhood Center, by forming new partnerships and continuing to serve all in need. Read more here.

St. Paul’s, Brunswick: The Rev. Ann Broomell, Transition Priest in Charge.  Discernment Committee conducting interviews.

St. Anne’s, Calais: The Rev. Jennifer Reece, called as Priest in Charge effective December 6, 2012.

St. Dunstan’s, Ellsworth:  The Rev. Christopher Chornyak resigned effective January 1, 2013.  Transition Priest in Charge to be announced.

St. Mary’s, Falmouth: The Rev. Nate Ferrell called as Rector effective November 1, 2012.

Christ Church, Gardiner: The Rev. George Lambert, Priest in Charge

Church of Our Father, Hulls Cove:  The Rev. Chuck Bradshaw resigned effective January 1, 2013.  Transition Priest in Charge to be announced.

St. Andrew’s, Millinocket:  The Rev. Lev Sherman, Priest in Charge.  Celebration of New Ministry on April 21.
St. Mary’s and St. Jude’s, Northeast Harbor:  The Rev. Patricia Robertson has announced that she will retire on May 31, 2013.  Vestry will call for Transition Priest in Charge.

Christ Church, Norway: The Rev. Elizabeth Miller, Transition Priest in Charge.  Congregational profile near completion.

St. Martin’s, Palmyra: Supply clergy during transition

St. Peter’s, Rockland:  Transition Priest in Charge has been called.  Awaiting finalized Letter of Agreement

All Saints’, Skowhegan: Supply clergy during transition

St. Thomas’, Winn:  The Rev. Lev Sherman, Priest in Charge.  Celebration of New Ministry on April 21.

St. Andrew’s, Winthrop: Supply clergy during transition

St. Philip’s, Wiscasset:  The Rev. Heather Blais, Assistant Priest has accepted a call to the Diocese of Western Massachusetts.   Priest in Charge has been called.  Awaiting finalized Letter of Agreement.

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News from Christ Church, Biddeford

From the Rev. Shirley Bowen, rector of Christ Church –

This month Christ Episcopal Church in Biddeford will suspend its Sunday services and be at rest until the annual Diocesan Convention in October 2013. We see this not as a closing of a church but as a transformation of a ministry. The parish will be in recess but the offspring of the church, Seeds of Hope Neighborhood Center is growing and open for all in need. We are forming new partnerships and caring for our neighbors in new ways. I will continue to offer weekly services and pastoral care for our neighbors.

On Sunday, Dec. 23 at 3:00 p.m. we will have a Service of Thanksgiving for the life of Christ Church and its ministry to God’s people in Biddeford. Bishop Stephen Lane and several diocesan leaders will be in attendance to acknowledge this transition.

In the coming weeks, you will learn more about our partnership with the Biddeford Housing Authority/Learning Works/YouthBuild. We believe this will be an exceptional collaboration and are excited about how we will be better positioned to serve our neighbors.

If you’re able, we would love to have you join us on the 23rd. Click here for an invitation.

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Congregations in transition update – June 2012

Here’s an update on Maine congregations in transition from Vicki Wiederkehr, Canon for Formation and Transition Ministry.

Aroostook Cluster (St. Luke’s, Caribou; St. Paul’s, Fort Fairfield; Advent, Limestone; St. Anne’s, Mars Hill; St. John’s, Presque Isle):  The Rev. Bob Smith has announced his retirement effective September 1, 2012.

St. Michael’s, Auburn:  The Rev. Jim Low, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Mark’s, Augusta:    The Rev. Stephen T. Foote, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Saviour’s, Bar Harbor and St. Andrew’s/St. John’s, Southwest Harbor:  The Rev. Timothy Fleck has been called as joint Priest in Charge.

St. Columba’s, Boothbay Harbor:  The Rev. Maria Hoecker, Vicar.  Celebration of New Ministry on Saturday, June 16, at 4 p.m.

St. Paul’s, Brunswick:  The Rev. Ann Broomell, Transition Priest in Charge – Finished Profile

St. Alban’s, Cape Elizabeth and St. Peter’s, Portland:  Kelly Moughty, Candidate for Holy Orders has accepted a call to serve collaboratively with both congregations for a three-year term commencing July 2.

St. Anne’s, Calais:  The Rev. Alice Downs, Priest in Charge

St. Mary’s, Falmouth:  The Rev. Barb Schmitz, Transition Priest in Charge – Beginning interviews.

St. Matthew’s, Hallowell:  The Rev. David Matson has been called as Rector

Christ Church, Gardiner:  The Rev. George Lambert, Priest in Charge

St. Giles’, Jefferson:  The Rev. Susan Kraus called as Rector.  Celebration of New Ministry on Sunday, June 3, at 9:30 a.m.

St. Andrew’s, Millinocket:  The Rev. Lev Sherman, Priest in Charge

Christ Church, Norway:  The Rev. Elizabeth Miller, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Martin’s, Palmyra:  Supply Clergy

St. Peter’s, Portland:  The Rev. Larry Weeks serving as Priest in Charge with supply clergy currently serving.  The Rev. Weeks is also Rector at Trinity, Portland.

All Saints’, Skowhegan:  Supply Clergy

St. Thomas’, Winn:  The Rev. Lev Sherman, Priest in Charge

St. Andrew’s, Winthrop:  The Rev. Ed Greene has announced his retirement effective August 19.

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Congregations in Transition Update

Here’s an update on Maine congregations in transition from Vicki Wiederkehr, Canon for Formation and Transition Ministry. Canon Wiederkehr may be reached at vwiederk@episcopalmaine.org or by calling 772-1953 x123.

St. Michael’s, Auburn:  The Rev. Jim Low, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Mark’s, Augusta:    The Rev. Stephen T. Foote, Transition Priest in Charge effective January 2012

St. Saviour’s, Bar Harbor and St. Andrew’s/St. John’s, Southwest Harbor:  Vestries currently interviewing for joint Priest in Charge

St. Columba’s, Boothbay Harbor:  The Rev. Maria Hoecker, Vicar effective January 2012

St. Paul’s, Brunswick:  The Rev. Ann Broomell, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Anne’s, Calais:  The Rev. Alice Downs, Priest in Charge effective January 2012

St. Mary’s, Falmouth:  The Rev. Barb Schmitz, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Matthew’s, Hallowell:  The Rev. David Matson, Priest in Charge

Christ Church, Norway:  Vestry negotiating Letter of Agreement for Transition Priest in Charge

St. Peter’s, Portland:  The Rev. Larry Weeks serving as Priest in Charge with supply clergy currently serving.  The Rev. Weeks is also Rector at Trinity, Portland.

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August update for congregations in transition

Here’s an update on Maine congregations in transition from Vicki Wiederkehr, Canon for Formation and Transition Ministry.

St. Michael’s, Auburn:  The Rev. Jim Low, Transition Priest in Charge

St. Mark’s, Augusta:    Vestry interviewing for Transition Priest in Charge.

St. Saviour’s, Bar Harbor:  The Rev. Jonathan Appleyard has announced his retirement effective October 2011.

St. Columba’s, Boothbay Harbor:  The Rev. John Ineson providing regular Sunday supply.  Congregational profile under development.

St. Patrick’s, Brewer*: A call has been made and a letter of agreement is in process

St. Peter’s, Bridgton:  The Rev. Craig Hacker called as Rector.

St. Paul’s, Brunswick:  The Rev. Dan Warren retired on July 31.

St. Anne’s, Calais:  Sunday supply.

St. Alban’s, Cape Elizabeth:  The Rev. Timothy Boggs called as Rector effective  September 7.

St. Mary’s, Falmouth:  The Rev. Barb Schmitz, Transition Priest in Charge

Good Shepherd, Houlton:  The Rev. Ginny Urbanek called as Priest in Charge

St. Andrew’s, Millinocket:  The Rev. Amelia Hagen is serving through the end of August

St. James’, Old Town*:  A call has been made and a letter of agreement is in process.

Christ Church, Norway:  The Rev. Anne Stanley has announced her retirement effective October 2.

St. Peter’s, Portland:  The Rev. Larry Weeks serving as Priest in Charge with supply clergy currently serving.  The Rev. Weeks is also Rector at Trinity, Portland.

St. Nicholas’, Scarborough:  The Rev. David S. Heald called as Priest in Charge effective August 29th

St. Mark’s, Waterville:  The Rev. John Balicki called as Rector effective August 22.

St. Thomas’, Winn:  The Rev. Amelia Hagen is serving through the end of August

St. Philip’s, Wiscasset and Grace Church, Bath:  The Rev. Heather Blais, Assistant Priest.  The Rev. Michael  Ambler, serves both as Rector of Grace Church and Priest in Charge of St. Philip’s.

*St. Patrick’s, Brewer, and St. James’, Old Town have made a joint call for a full-time position.

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