Category Archives: St. Ann’s Windham

Expand your ministry with a New Initiative Fund grant

Dreaming about a new ministry in your community?

Apply now for a 2016 New Initiative Grant from Diocesan Council.

Each congregation and organization in the Diocese of Maine is eligible to apply for funding to support new ministries or expanding existing ministries in new directions. Applications will be evaluated on the how closely they meet the Diocese’s Seven Criteria for Mission.

The next deadline for applications is 4 p.m. on Friday, January 22. Diocesan Council will make grant recommendations at its February 6 meeting.

The online application may be found at www.surveymonkey.com/r/MaineNIF

Download the application worksheet and complete your application on that before cutting and pasting your application into the online Survey Monkey application above.

Once your application is processed, you will be contacted by a Diocesan Council member from your area. That member will serve as your advocate through the application process.

What kind of ministry might a New Initiative Fund grant get going? Below is a list of grants made by Diocesan Council over the past two years in spring and fall grant cycles.

Dream big!

2015 New Initiative Fund Grants

St. Luke’s, Wilton – $3,000 to install a community labyrinth

Human Trafficking Ministry Group – $2,650 to bring Becca Stevens and women of Thistle Farms to a conference in November 2015

St. Matthew’s, Hallowell – $2,450 to support a Ecumenical mentoring program for women recently released Kennebec County Jail, Walk with Me: A Journey

St. Paul’s, Brunswick – $1,750 to gather and create resources for congregations to effectively talk about alcoholism

2014 New Initiative Fund Grants 

The Congregations of the Southern Kennebec Valley (The Kennebec 6 – St. Mark’s, Augusta; St. Barnabas’, Augusta; Christ Church, Gardiner; St. Matthew’s, Hallowell; St. Andrew’s, Winthrop; and Prince of Peace Lutheran, Augusta) – $10,680 to establish a Sunday afternoon community Christian education program for families called “Mustard Seeds”

Trinity Church, Portland – $4,600 to assist All Saints Community Church, a Sudanese congregation that had met at Trinity for four years, in establishing a Christian education program

St. Nicholas’, Scarborough – $2,200 to establish a community garden on their Route 1 campus

St. Ann’s, Windham – $3,000 to establish an essentials pantry for needy members of their community

St. Peter’s, Bridgton – $2,400 for Women’s Initiative Mentoring Program

Diocesan Christian Ed Collaboration – $6,700 to bring Godly Play training to Maine

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Filed under Church at 209 Augusta, Diocesan Council, Diocesan Life, Ministry and Outreach, St. Ann's Windham, St. Luke's Wilton, St. Matthew's Hallowell, St. Nicholas' Scarborough, St. Paul's Brunswick, St. Peter's Bridgton, Trinity Portland

Deputy of the Day – Dick Rozene

by Dick Rozene, Deputation Chair
St. Ann’s, Windham

Even the deputation chair has to wear the hat.

Even the deputation chair has to wear the hat.

Today was one of our busiest days of the General Convention. We met as the House of Deputies to continue the discussion on the restructuring and streamlining of TEC operations; we met to hear and participate in the House of Deputies debate on marriage; and we met as a combined House of Deputies and Bishops to receive the operating budget for The Episcopal Church (TEC) over the next three years. The “temperature” in our house has been warm, sometimes edging on hot, but we are moving ahead on our tasks, albeit a bit more slowly than I might prefer.

As we have each day preceding, we began with Eucharist. The sermon was by the Rev. Becca Stevens, founder of Thistle Farms, who is coming to Maine later this year to share her ministry of healing and empowerment among women who have survived prostitution, trafficking, and addiction. The day was topped off by a celebration of Utah at the world famous Salt Lake City tabernacle.

As to the business of the day, Bishop Steve is the vice chair of the very important Joint Committee on Program, Budget, and Finance (PBF). Two bold initiatives have been proposed for the next three years: to 1) allocate $2,000,000 for racial injustice and 2) decrease the financial ask from TEC over the next triennium (from the present 19 % to 18% in 2016, to 16,5% in 2017, and 15% in 2018. After 2019, the church asking would be set at 15%). This will be debated on Thursday, July 2. Think what we could do with more money to spend on mission!

Earlier this week, the House of Bishops  approved two liturgies for trial use that will permit same-sex couples to be married in the Episcopal Church, beginning on the first Sunday of Advent of this year. Their action came just days after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same-sex couples can now be married in all 50 states. Today the House of Deputies concurred.

The two liturgies include a gender-neutral version of the current marriage service in the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, as well as a version of a liturgy that was approved in 2012 for blessing same-sex unions that now also provides vows of marriage. These rites do not refer to “man and woman” or “husband and wife,” but instead use “these persons” or “the couple” to refer to the two people being married.

The House of Deputies also concurred with the House of Bishops on Resolution A036, which makes changes to the marriage canons to permit clergy to use either the current Prayer Book marriage rite or one of the trial use liturgies when performing marriages.

Sadly, this morning Deputy Brenda Hamilton had to leave early to be with her dad who suffered a stroke earlier in convention. At lunch today our deputation prayed together for her dad, Richard, Brenda and the family.

Heidi Shott and Dick Rozene at the Mormon Temple in downtown SLC.

Heidi Shott and Dick Rozene at the Mormon Temple in downtown SLC.

Although I’ve been through Salt Lake City before, this is my first time to enjoy this wonderful city. On my one free night, Canon Heidi Shott and I wandered from the Latter Day Saints complex to a modern shopping complex and past a variety of sights. A mixture of old and new, e.g., an operating tower clock originally powered by water in front of the first commercial building constructed in Salt Lake in 1868 and now a bank, a five-story sandstone building literally tucked in between an architecturally magnificent office building and a multi-story building under construction. Salt Lake is a “green” city with numerous LEED certified buildings.

As a first time deputy, I’ve a few observations from my time at the 78th General Convention.

  • I never thought I would go to GC –here I am witnessing and participating in the work of The Episcopal Church.
  • I’ve never taken part in a march, yet on Sunday I eagerly participated in the march against gun violence. Stories from gun violence survivors made an indelible impact and strengthened my resolve.
  • GC has been humbling –several of us have had active roles in the daily Eucharists. We’ve also struggled with resolutions with monumental impacts on all our people. I hope we go forward with grace.
  • GC has been celebratory –we’ve elected a new Presiding Bishop, the first African American to lead our church. We are also looking to restructure the church to respond to the needs of the 21st century. As deputies, we have renewed acquaintances and made new ones. Finally, we’ve met folks who love Maine.
  • GC has been a thankful experience – for our own deputies and our bishop; for meeting other diocesan treasurers and sharing stories and challenges, and to see a blend of the experienced deputies helping the 40% who are here for the first time, most of whom are younger than me.
  • What did we do before electronic balloting?

The challenge lies before us as Maine deputies is when we return with the energy we’ve accumulated over the last seven days. How will we to share it with the rest of our diocese? I have a feeling that our Presiding Bishop–Elect Michael Curry will help us do that.

As Lee Iaccoca used to say: “Lead, follow, or get out of the way!’

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Filed under General Convention, News from The Episcopal Church, St. Ann's Windham

Bishop Lane offers Ashes to Go in Portland; Ashes to Go also in Windham, Brunswick, Lewiston and Farmington

Nina Pooley of St. Bart's, Yarmouth, and David Heald of St. Nick's, Scarborough, prayer with a man in the Old Port.

Nina Pooley of St. Bart’s, Yarmouth, and David Heald of St. Nick’s, Scarborough, pray with a man in the Old Port.

On Wednesday, February 18, a group Episcopal clergy, including the Rt. Rev. Stephen T. Lane, Bishop of Maine, will brave the snow to take the traditional Ash Wednesday practice of the imposition of ashes from inside of church buildings out to the people on the streets of Portland, Windham, Brunswick, Lewiston, and Farmington.

Started by Episcopal clergy in Chicago in 2007, Ashes to Go marks its fourth year in Maine communities. First offered on a commuter rail platform, the practice has spread to dozens of cities across the U.S.

“Not everyone is able to be in their church today. It’s a way of bringing the church’s presence outside a building and offering an opportunity for people to practice their faith as they go about their daily life and work,” said the Rev. Larry Weeks of Trinity Episcopal and St. Peter’s Episcopal Portland. In 2012 Weeks organized the first Ashes to Go in Portland. The first year more an 120 people availed themselves of the opportunity to receive ashes and a blessing.
Shirley Bowen offers ashes to a passerby at Monument Square.  Tim Higgins (left) and Peter Bowen look on. (Photo: Robert Bukaty/AP)

Shirley Bowen offers ashes to a passerby at Monument Square. Tim Higgins (left) and Peter Bowen look on. (Photo: Robert Bukaty/AP)

In Portland all who wish the imposition of ashes and a brief blessing are welcome at Monument Square from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Dean Ben Shambaugh and Deacon Dick Rasner of St. Luke’s Cathedral and the Rev. Larry Weeks will be on hand from 10 a.m. to noon. Bishop Stephen Lane will take the noon to 2 p.m. “shift” in full Bishop vestments (though maybe with a warm hat under his mitre.)

In Windham the Rev. Tim Higgins and Deacon Wendy Rozene of St. Ann’s Episcopal will offer Ashes to Go at the Windham Post Office parking lot on Route 302 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

In Farmington the Rev. Tim Walmer of St. Luke’s Episcopal in Wilton will offer Ashes to Go on Main Street near the Franklin Savings Bank from 12:15 to 1 p.m.

In Brunswick Deacon Chick Carroll of St. Paul’s Episcopal will offer Ashes to Go at 11 a.m. at the soup kitchen located at Midcoast Hunger Prevention on Union Street and at 1 p.m. in front of the Bowdoin College Chapel. The Rev. Carolyn Eklund and Deacon Mary Lee Wile will offer Ashes to Go from 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. in front of the Tontine Mall at the corner of Pleasant and Maine Streets.

In Lewiston, the Rev. Steven Crowson of Trinity Episcopal will offer Ashes to Go at Kennedy Park at the corner of Bates and Spruce from 11 to 11:30 a.m. From noon to 12:30 Ashes to Go will be available at the opposite end of the park across from City Hall.

In the Christian tradition, Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent, the six weeks leading up to Easter. As a time of self-reflection for believers, Lent is often marked by prayer, penance, and charity.

The Rev. Tim Higgins, rector of St. Ann’s Episcopal Church in Windham, described his experience last year as “one of the coolest ministries I have ever been involved with.” He added,  “A jogger came through and stopped long enough to pray with us, receive his ashes and continue on his jog, while saying, ‘I’ve never done that before, thanks so much!’”

Weeks added, “We found that many people had forgotten that it was Ash Wednesday and welcomed the opportunity to receive ashes and a blessing. It’s high time we venture outside our church walls to offer hope and forgiveness and healing to people who may still have a spiritual hunger but aren’t so sure about Church.”

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Filed under Diocesan Life, St. Ann's Windham, St. Luke's Cathedral, St. Luke's Wilton, St. Paul's Brunswick, Trinity Lewiston, Trinity Portland

A parish retreat at Bishopswood builds bonds of connection

by Kirsten Lowell
St. Ann’s, Windham

IMG_9793Moments of solitude, moments of fellowship, moments of peace, and moments of laughter. Moments like these were enjoyed throughout the woods of Camp Bishopswood in Hope over Labor Day weekend. More than 50 members of the St. Ann’s community in Windham gathered at beautiful Camp Bishopswood for a weekend of play, relaxation, discussion, learning, and worship. There were parents and children, grandparents and grandchildren, friends new and old.

The discussion over the course of the weekend focused on a video by Brené Brown, “The Power of Vulnerability,” which deals with the topics of courage, compassion, and connection. We learned about love and how it can, at times, seem harder than we originally thought. We gained courage to be vulnerable with one another and grow deeper in connection with each other. We showed compassion throughout the weekend by lending a helping hand, offering encouragement, and unconditionally loving one another. We connected through meals, focus groups, living in cabins together, playing games, and worship.

We no longer were strangers, or someone we simply said hello to on Sunday mornings. We left each discussion time with a better understanding of where we each come from and where we are currently.

The youth led a magnificent worship service for us including readings, dance, and music. They worked so beautifully st. anns retreattogether to create a worship service where there was a little bit of something for everyone. It was wonderful to see the youth use their talents to praise God and bring joy into the lives of others. On Sunday morning we enjoyed Eucharist in the chapel overlooking the beautiful lake. During this time we had come together in prayer during a healing service and prayer circles, at which point a young child, just three years old, joined in prayer and laying of hands for his mother. The power of prayer felt throughout the chapel was definitely something all present will remember for quite some time.

The weather was extremely cooperative, which allowed for some extended outdoor play Sunday afternoon. Each of the kayaks and canoes was put to good use by young and old alike, exploring the beautiful Lake Megunticook. A few were even brave enough to try their hand at paddle boarding, some more successfully than others.

IMG_9792Having Camp Bishopswood as a place for retreat from daily life allowed for some reflective alone time for many as well. Some enjoyed their time at Chapel Rocks, others enjoyed time sitting on the Great Hall Porch rocking away in the rocking chairs.

Camp is a place where age does not matter, and St. Ann’s weekend retreat truly reflected that. It was a time when teens and youth were placed in the same discussion groups with the elders of the church. It was a time when each person served one another, both at meal times and in worship. Each person laughed as we roasted marshmallows around a lakeside campfire and many of us stayed up late chatting in the cabins.

Not only did we learn about courage, compassion, and connection, we used the weekend together as a time to put these three things into practice along with the hopes of bringing them back to the rest of the St. Ann’s community who could not join us for the retreat.

We used our time together in focus groups and in play to truly build long lasting friendships and relationships. Folks are already looking forward to next year’s retreat!

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Filed under Camp Bishopswood, Diocesan Life, Fun, St. Ann's Windham

Young Mainer finds her longed for “fire” as missionary to Uruguay

by Kirsten Lowell
St. Ann’s, Windham

kirstenImagine waking up every day for an entire year in a place unlike anywhere you have ever been. Imagine waking up every day to form relationships with people in a language that you are attempting to comprehend. Imagine waking up every day to serve and worship in a culture that is outside your past experience. Imagine waking up every day to grow in your faith 5,351 miles away from your home. All that is pretty hard to imagine, but it’s about to happen to me in August as I head to the Anglican Diocese of Uruguay as a missionary with the Young Adult Service Corps.

Six months ago, I was living an average life for a 23 year-old. I lived with roommates, worked 40 hours a week, cooked dinner, and watched Jeopardy most evenings. While I was content with where I was and what I was doing, I desired more and longed for some fire in my life that I could not place my finger on.

Five months ago, I found that fire. I was presented with the opportunity to apply to the Young Adult Service Corps (YASC), a missionary program through the Episcopal Church for young adults ages 21-30. It is described like this:“The Young Adult Service Corps brings young adults into the life of the worldwide Anglican Communion and into the daily work of a local community.  At the same time, it brings the gifts and resources of the church into the lives of young adults as they explore their own faith journeys.”

Since then, life has been a whirlwind of interviews, prayers, discernment, prayers, training, prayers, education, and most importantly, prayers.

I grew up in St. Ann’s in Windham as an active participant in the acolyte and youth programs for not only St. Ann’s but in the Diocese of Maine. I represented the Diocese of Maine at the National Acolyte Festival in Washington D.C. in 2004, Episcopal Youth Event (EYE) in 2005, and a Province I event in Connecticut in 2007. I served as staff at many middle school events, TECs and Happenings, and served as Assistant Rector for Happening in 2007. While attending school outside of Philadelphia, PA, and working in the area for the past few years, I have stayed connected to my home parish and the Diocese of Maine and continue to consider it my home. I served as a counselor at BION this past summer, attended a young adult retreat in January, volunteered as an adult at TEC in March, and I’m excited to have the opportunity to attend BION again later this summer before heading to Uruguay to begin my work with YASC. I’m excited for what this coming year may bring, and I’m thrilled to have such an amazing and wonderful community of people to share it with.

There will be days when I am like Peter – walking on water, fearless, with a strong faith – but there are also days when, like Peter, I will begin to sink and have doubts. That’s when I’ll need to remember how quickly Jesus reached out and picked him back up. But for right now, I am stepping out of the boat, beginning my journey.

It is hard to predict what this year will bring for me and for the community I will be living and serving in, but we are in this together. We are the body of Christ. We are one body, many parts. This coming year as I serve as the hands and feet, and I invite you, members of the Episcopal Church in Maine, to be part of the heart of my ministry. Please share the journey with me by offering prayers and following my messages home to Maine.

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Filed under Ministry and Outreach, St. Ann's Windham, Youth and Young Adults